<
 
 
 
 
×
>
You are viewing an archived web page captured at 02:23:07 Jun 22, 2021, which is part of the National Records of Scotland Web Archive. The information on this web page may be out of date. See all captures of this archived page. Archived web pages you visit here may leave cookies in your browser. These are not owned, controlled, or used by NRS. NRS do use cookies, including Google Analytics, to monitor site usage and performance. These can be managed in your browser settings. Find out more about cookies.
Loading media information
hide
body furniture

RSS icon Search Results

Showing 1 to 20 of 134 1 2 3 4 5 6 > >>

news and communications

COVID-19: Physical Activity Key Messages

Last Updated: 9/2/2020

Key messaging from Public Health Scotland on Physical Activity during the phases of Covid-19 as of 31st of August 2020.

news and communications

COVID-19: Diet and Healthy Weight Key Messages

Last Updated: 9/1/2020

Key messaging from Public Health Scotland on Diet and Healthy Weight during the phases of Covid-19 as of 28th August 2020.

case study

Raising the bar on strength and balance: The importance of community-based provision

Last Updated: 2/27/2019

The Centre for Ageing Better has produced a best practice guide to delivery of strength and balance programmes and the importance of referral pathways from rehabilitation to community based provision of programmes for effective dose for prevention of falls and frailty

report

Public attitudes to reducing overweight and obesity in Scotland

Last Updated: 2/5/2019

An NHS Health Scotland report containing data from ScotCen's Scottish Social Attitudes survey on how overweight and obesity and their consequences are recognised by people in Scotland. It also discusses barriers to maintaining a healthy weight, diet and physical activity. It then goes on to discuss who is responsible for reducing obesity, and what public support there is for this.

report

How do we address the low numbers of women travelling actively in the UK?

Last Updated: 3/12/2018

Gender inequality remains a big issue when it comes to active travel in the UK, says Sustrans. The charity has published a new report, ‘Are We Not There Yet?, revealing that women’s journeys around cities are typically shorter than men’s, use different modes of transport and are more likely to involve ‘trip-chaining’ (multi-stop journeys) which tend to be for a balance of child care, work and household responsibilities. While women are motivated to travel actively for physical and mental health reasons, worries about their personal safety, convenience (particularly when taking multi-stop trips) and appearance are all barriers to preventing them from cycling and walking, says the report. It looked at the travel habits and choices of nearly 2,000 women in Glasgow and combined the findings with a literature review of research on women’s travel patterns across Scotland, the UK and Europe. The report also highlighted that few women are involved in creating transport policy and planning in the UK. Currently, transport has the lowest percentage of women in senior posts within the public sector in Scotland, with women representing only 6.25% heads of transport bodies. In addition, the transport sector accounts for only 22% of female workers UK-wide. Read the full report here:

report

524 million public transport journeys in Scotland were made in 2016/17

Last Updated: 3/12/2018

National Statistics released by Transport Scotland show that of public transport journeys 75% were made by bus, 18% by rail, 5% by air and 2% by ferry. In addition to public transport journeys the publication also shows that in Scotland: • Car traffic is estimated to have increased by 2% over the year to 35.4 billion vehicle kilometres and pedal cycle traffic is estimated to have increased by 3% to 352 million vehicle kilometres in 2016. • Nine million motor vehicles were licensed by the end of 2016 and 270,000 new vehicle registrations in 2016. Eighty two per cent of all vehicles licensed were cars. • There were 46.4 billion vehicle kilometres travelled on Scotland’s roads in 2016, a 2% increase on the previous year. • There were 393 million passenger journeys by bus in 2016, accounting for 75% of all public transport journeys. • There were 94.2 million passenger journeys on ScotRail services in 2016/17, an increase of 1% since 2015/16. Read more here:

report

Public attitudes to reducing overweight and obesity in Scotland

Last Updated: 2/12/2018

This report contains data from ScotCen's Scottish Social Attitudes survey. It looks at how overweight and obesity and their consequences are recognised by people in Scotland. It also discusses barriers to maintaining a healthy weight, diet and physical activity. It then goes on to discuss who is responsible for reducing obesity, and what public support there is for this.

case study

Sport protects mental health of children who experience trauma

Last Updated: 2/12/2018

Taking part in sport protects children who are abused or neglected from developing mental health problems in later life, according to a major public health study. People who had adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) but regularly played sports as children were less likely to have a mental illness as an adult, the study found. People who had traumatic childhoods were also more likely to be mentally healthy if they took part in sport as adults. The study confirmed a strong link between ACEs, which include sexual and physical abuse, parental separation and living with domestic violence, and mental illness as an adult. It said people who had four or more ACEs were four times more likely to be receiving treatment for current mental illnesses and 10 times more likely to have self-harmed or felt suicidal than those who had experienced none. Read more below:

report

Best buys for preventing NCDs

Last Updated: 1/12/2018

The World Health Organization has released a list of ‘Best Buys’ and recommended interventions to address non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The best buy for physical activity is considered to be the implementation of community-wide public education and awareness campaigns for physical activity which include mass media campaigns combined with other community-based education, motivational and environmental programmes aimed at supporting behavioural change of physical activity levels. Other cost effective interventions include the provision of physical activity counselling and referral as part of routine primary health care services through the use of brief interventions. The list also contains recommended interventions that have not been subject to a cost analysis. The report contains 88 interventions for: the four key behavioural risk factors for NCDs - tobacco, harmful use of alcohol, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity four key disease areas - cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory disease.

report

Obesity Statistics in Scotland

Last Updated: 1/9/2018

A new report by Scotland’s Chief Statistician summarises the latest figures on obesity in Scotland. The purpose of the report is to monitor the progress of the Scottish Government’s Prevention of Obesity Route Map. In 2016, 65% of adults aged 16 and over were overweight, including 29% who were obese. Levels of overweight and obesity increased between 1995 and 2008, but have remained relatively stable since then. Sixty four percent of adults aged 16 and over met the current moderate/vigorous physical activity of at least 150 minutes per week. There has been no significant change to this proportion since 2012. Seventy six percent of children are active for an average of 60 minutes per day (including school-based activity). Trends in physical activity for children have fluctuated over the years but the 2016 figure is the joint highest along with 2014.

briefing paper

Briefing Paper: Improving health and wellbeing through Our Natural Health Service

Last Updated: 11/17/2017

The summary of the Holyrood Communications policy briefing event which was held in Edinburgh on the 3rd of October is now available to access online:

report

The National Walking and Cycling Network in Scotland helps increase physical activity say nearly 80% of users

Last Updated: 9/8/2017

A new report on Scotland’s National Walking and Cycling Network shows almost four fifths of users believe that the network of paths helps them increase their physical activity. Over half (52%) stated that the existence of Scotland’s National Walking and Cycling Network allowed them to actively travel on foot or by bike rather than taking the car. Read the full story here:

report

New findings: Physical activity levels amongst 10 -11 year olds in Scotland

Last Updated: 8/15/2017

The Scottish Government has published a new report ‘Objectively measured physical activity levels of Scottish children: analysis from a sub-sample of 10-11 year-olds in the Growing Up in Scotland study’. This report uses GUS data to explore the physical activity and sedentary levels in Scottish 10-11 year old children. Using two approaches, self-reported and objectively measured physical activity, the analysis examines differences in activity levels by gender and area deprivation.  The report was written by Paul McCrorie and Anne Ellaway from the Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow. This work part of a wider academic study exploring the environmental determinants of physical activity in young people that also incorporates GPS data on where young people are most active (SPACES – Studying Physical Activity in Children’s Environments Across Scotland).

case study

Central Scotland Green Network

Last Updated: 8/15/2017

Five new case studies are available to download from the Central Scotland Green Network (CSGN) website. The case studies, which cover routes in Copenhagen, Hamburg, Belfast, Edinburgh and across the UK, offer a flavour of how active travel and green infrastructure can be integrated within different worldwide contexts. Green active travel routes represent the deliberate choice to combine natural planting, greenery or water systems together with paths for people on foot or on bike. The addition of green infrastructure to active travel routes provides multiple benefits. These include flood mitigation, climate change adaption, increased biodiversity, connectivity and a positive impact on mental health and wellbeing.

case study

Inverclyde Million Miles Challenge

Last Updated: 7/27/2017

World Walking is a free and easy to use website/app designed simply to motivate people to walk more inspired by the exploits of the Inverclyde Globetrotters, a voluntary, not for profit group formed from an exercise class which meets at Inverclyde Leisure’s Waterfront Gym in Greenock each week as part of Inverclyde Leisure’s wide range of fit for life exercise classes.

case study

New Green Ways to Health Case Study

Last Updated: 7/19/2017

The latest case study from the NHS Greenspace Demonstration Project has been published by the Green Exercise Partnership on developments at New Craigs Hospital Inverness. The full case study can be accessed via the link below:

case study

Health Walks are helping to reconnect the Highlands

Last Updated: 7/17/2017

Walking for Health project, Step It Up Highland have added two new case studies to their growing series. Both highlight how Health Walks play an important community development role helping people living in rural areas to become more active and socially connected. Case study 11 - Tackling social isolation Mallaig area Walking Group explains how the weekly Health Walk in Mallaig, Morar and Arisaig has brought people together. Rotating each week between the three areas gives everyone an opportunity to visit new locations. Car sharing is popular, along with a visit to a local café at the end of the walk. One 86-year-old walker said, “I am so much more confident now in my ability to walk and have discovered the joy of using walking poles. I would never have done this without the security of a led walk in the company of others.” Read more below:

briefing paper

Policy Briefing - Engaging Girls in Physical Activity

Last Updated: 7/17/2017

A new policy report by researchers at the University of Bristol outlines the evidence on the gender participation gap in children. The work presented in the review can be used to support work on a local and national level to ensure that girls can be active and stay active throughout childhood and adolescence. The four findings with policy implications highlighted in the briefing are: 1. Peer power and girls activity 2. Parents can help motivate their daughters 3. Active travel is a promising way to increase girls’ activity 4. Active after school clubs are promising but need to be designed to appeal to girls and boys.

report

Keep Scotland Beautiful Place Standard Report

Last Updated: 7/3/2017

NHS Health Scotland were involved in a pilot of the Place Standard Tool, with Keep Scotland Beautiful and East Dunbartonshire Community Planning Partnership between June 2016 and February 2017. The pilot has been written up as a report and Keep Scotland Beautiful have published it on their website today, along with a web statement. You can read the report and the web statement below. The project used the Place Standard engagement tool to evaluate the quality of a community, and identify both positive and negative factors about the area. East Dunbartonshire Community Planning Partnership will use the results of the pilot to support improvements in Hillhead and Harestanes. NHS Health Scotland will use the report to refine the tool for future use.

report

Realising Realistic Medicine - Scotland's CMO annual report

Last Updated: 4/11/2017

Scotland’s Chief Medical Officer has published her second annual report, Realising Realistic Medicine. Realistic Medicine aims to put the person receiving health and care at the centre of decision-making and creates a personalised approach to their care. It aims to reduce harm, waste and unwarranted variation, while managing risks and innovating to improve. The report also contains a traditional snapshot of the health of the nation. In terms of adults (16 years and over) there has been relatively little change in physical activity levels over the last few years, and there continues to be a difference by gender. Whilst over two-thirds of men meet physical activity guidelines, less than 60% of women do. Additionally, just under one in five men have very low levels of activity, this is closer to one in four women.

Showing 1 to 20 of 134 1 2 3 4 5 6 > >>

Copyright 2009 NHS Health Scotland