<
 
 
 
 
×
>
You are viewing an archived web page captured at 02:46:09 Jun 22, 2021, which is part of the National Records of Scotland Web Archive. The information on this web page may be out of date. See all captures of this archived page. Archived web pages you visit here may leave cookies in your browser. These are not owned, controlled, or used by NRS. NRS do use cookies, including Google Analytics, to monitor site usage and performance. These can be managed in your browser settings. Find out more about cookies.
Loading media information
hide
body furniture

RSS icon Search Results

Showing 1 to 20 of 23 1 2 >

report

Obesity Statistics in Scotland

Last Updated: 1/9/2018

A new report by Scotland’s Chief Statistician summarises the latest figures on obesity in Scotland. The purpose of the report is to monitor the progress of the Scottish Government’s Prevention of Obesity Route Map. In 2016, 65% of adults aged 16 and over were overweight, including 29% who were obese. Levels of overweight and obesity increased between 1995 and 2008, but have remained relatively stable since then. Sixty four percent of adults aged 16 and over met the current moderate/vigorous physical activity of at least 150 minutes per week. There has been no significant change to this proportion since 2012. Seventy six percent of children are active for an average of 60 minutes per day (including school-based activity). Trends in physical activity for children have fluctuated over the years but the 2016 figure is the joint highest along with 2014.

resource

Planning Cities to boost Physical Activity

Last Updated: 1/9/2018

A new publication - Towards More Physical Activity in Cities - from the World Health Organization/Europe is offering guiding principles to help countries transform urban settings and public spaces to promote physically active lifestyles. It explores options and strategies to boost physical activity in cities and advocates urban planning as a means to prevent physical inactivity. The report discusses options for improving the physical infrastructure and spaces in cities and towns to transform the quality of public spaces and encourage more physical activity. The report offers an analysis of existing initiatives designed to boost physical activity in cities, aiming to move such initiatives forward. It also focuses on recent case studies of urban planning to promote physical activity. It specifically explores examples from parts of Europe that have been less studied, and aims to demonstrate how common principles and concepts in urban planning can be used to encourage greater levels of physical activity.

briefing paper

Briefing Paper: Improving health and wellbeing through Our Natural Health Service

Last Updated: 11/17/2017

The summary of the Holyrood Communications policy briefing event which was held in Edinburgh on the 3rd of October is now available to access online:

Uncategorised

New Health Walk map launched

Last Updated: 10/25/2017

Paths for All has launched a new map of over 500 Health Walks to get people active, with the help of Walk It Borders. The online map plots the details of the free walks, which usually last 30 to 60 minutes. The 500 walks are well spread across the mainland and islands with walks taking place in every local authority. 9000 volunteers have been trained and supported to lead these walks in communities across Scotland. The walks are low – level, safe, and social, and are aimed at people looking to get more active.

  • What is it about? walking
  • Where is it relevant? Scotland
  • When was this published? 11/1/2017
research

Physical activity outside of school is vital for child health

Last Updated: 10/17/2017

Physical activity outside of school is vital for child health, and could play a vital role in helping children meet government recommendations, according to new research funded in Bristol. The researchers found that children who do activity outside of school in addition to during school hours are much more likely to meet the Government’s physical activity guidelines. The results, published in BMJ Open, suggest that current efforts to increase exercise during the school day won’t be enough for children to meet the recommended one hour of physical activity a day, set by the Chief Medical Officer.

report

New findings: Physical activity levels amongst 10 -11 year olds in Scotland

Last Updated: 8/15/2017

The Scottish Government has published a new report ‘Objectively measured physical activity levels of Scottish children: analysis from a sub-sample of 10-11 year-olds in the Growing Up in Scotland study’. This report uses GUS data to explore the physical activity and sedentary levels in Scottish 10-11 year old children. Using two approaches, self-reported and objectively measured physical activity, the analysis examines differences in activity levels by gender and area deprivation.  The report was written by Paul McCrorie and Anne Ellaway from the Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow. This work part of a wider academic study exploring the environmental determinants of physical activity in young people that also incorporates GPS data on where young people are most active (SPACES – Studying Physical Activity in Children’s Environments Across Scotland).

Uncategorised

Place Standard App

Last Updated: 8/15/2017

An app for the Place Standard is now available to download for free for Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. This is an important milestone in the development of the Place Standard tool. It is the result of design work by PAS, Scottish Government and Luma 3di Ltd. The App should increase the accessibility and reach of the tool across many user groups. But in particular for young people, several of whom have contributed during its development. By referring to the App it should be possible to facilitate conversations that will bring together younger and older generations, allowing them to compare viewpoints about the places they inhabit. The App has been designed to integrate with the online tool. Groups can use either digital format and the results from both can be collated or analyzed together.

case study

Central Scotland Green Network

Last Updated: 8/15/2017

Five new case studies are available to download from the Central Scotland Green Network (CSGN) website. The case studies, which cover routes in Copenhagen, Hamburg, Belfast, Edinburgh and across the UK, offer a flavour of how active travel and green infrastructure can be integrated within different worldwide contexts. Green active travel routes represent the deliberate choice to combine natural planting, greenery or water systems together with paths for people on foot or on bike. The addition of green infrastructure to active travel routes provides multiple benefits. These include flood mitigation, climate change adaption, increased biodiversity, connectivity and a positive impact on mental health and wellbeing.

case study

Inverclyde Million Miles Challenge

Last Updated: 7/27/2017

World Walking is a free and easy to use website/app designed simply to motivate people to walk more inspired by the exploits of the Inverclyde Globetrotters, a voluntary, not for profit group formed from an exercise class which meets at Inverclyde Leisure’s Waterfront Gym in Greenock each week as part of Inverclyde Leisure’s wide range of fit for life exercise classes.

survey data

OS Open Greenspace

Last Updated: 7/19/2017

Ordnance Survey have this week launched a new free Greenspace layer in OS Maps which allows people to discover greenspaces across Britain. With the aim of encouraging people to get outdoors, it provides an easy way to locate places for leisure and recreation from public parks and play areas, to sports facilities and even allotments. As there continues to be an increasing focus on active travel as a means to improve health and wellbeing, Ordnance Survey hope that this freely available dataset will support initiatives to get people outside and moving. Beyond active travel plans, they also hope it will support environmental initiatives that include air quality, biodiversity, housing regeneration and flood resilience.

resource

New app to improve engagement on place and health

Last Updated: 7/18/2017

An app for the Place Standard has been developed for the first time. It is now available to download for free for Android or Apple smartphones or tablets.  The places and spaces where we live and work have an impact on our health. The people who live in a community are best placed to design them in a way that will ensure they promote good health and reduce health inequalities. That is why, with the Scottish Government and Architecture and Design, we developed the Place Standard Tool. It helps to structure the conversations between planners and communities necessary to design healthy spaces and places.  John Howie, Organisational Lead for Place at NHS Health Scotland said:  “This is an important milestone in the development of the Place Standard tool.  "The app will increase the accessibility and reach of the tool across many user groups. We particularly hope it will increase use among young people, several of whom have contributed to its development.  The app will help facilitate conversations that will bring together younger and older generations, allowing them to compare viewpoints about the places they are in, creating the sorts of spaces that everyone can enjoy”.  This is the first release of the app for public download. It has been designed to integrate with the online tool, which means users will be able to use the online tool or the app and the results from both can be collated or analysed together

research review

Evidence Review on Spatial Planning for Health

Last Updated: 7/17/2017

A new evidence review on spatial planning for health has been published, providing evidence-informed principles for designing healthy places. The report provides findings from an evidence review examining the links between health and the built and natural environments. It is designed to help inform policy and support local action - concentrating on five key topics, neighbourhood design, housing, access to healthier food, natural and sustainable environment and transport. The review contains diagrams, which illustrate the link between planning principles, impact and positive health related outcomes.

Evidence Brief

Middle Aged Office Workers sit more than older adults

Last Updated: 7/17/2017

Researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Research Centre in Edinburgh have found that middle-aged office workers are more sedentary than pensioners on weekdays. The study used data from the Scottish Health Questionnaire to look at sedentary behaviour including time spent sat down at work and its variation across age groups and gender. 14,367 participants were asked to report on their time spent sedentary at work in a standard day, leisure time sedentary behaviour on a typical weekday and weekend day. The authors state that the majority of middle aged adults reported similar levels of sedentary behaviour to older adults. For adults in work, the time spent inactive during the weekdays is greater for all age groups than for adults aged 75 and above which is reversed at the weekend, indicating that work has a large impact on activity levels. Key findings • For all adults in work, total sedentary time was higher for each age category than for those 75 and over. • For men in work, the biggest difference was between those aged 55-64 who were on average sedentary for 84 minutes longer than those aged 75 and above per day. • For all men, the youngest age group reported less sedentary time than the oldest age group (6.6 hours vs 7.4 hours) • For all men, the age group between 45 and 54 reported significantly more (24 minutes) sedentary time than the oldest age group. • For all women, the oldest age group (75+) reported more sedentary time than those aged between 16 and 75. • For men not in work, most age groups reported less sedentary time than those aged 75 and above.

research review

Cochrane review shows that making changes to diet, physical activity and behaviour may reduce obesity in children and adolescents

Last Updated: 7/17/2017

Two new Cochrane Reviews have been published summarising the evidence on the effects of different interventions for treating obesity and overweight in childhood and adolescence. The reviews summarize the results of 114 studies which involved more than 13,000 children and young people. They show that a combination of diet, physical activity, and behavioural change interventions may reduce weight in children aged 6 to 11 years and in adolescents aged 12 to 17, but there are limitations in the studies and variation in the results.

briefing paper

Policy Briefing - Engaging Girls in Physical Activity

Last Updated: 7/17/2017

A new policy report by researchers at the University of Bristol outlines the evidence on the gender participation gap in children. The work presented in the review can be used to support work on a local and national level to ensure that girls can be active and stay active throughout childhood and adolescence. The four findings with policy implications highlighted in the briefing are: 1. Peer power and girls activity 2. Parents can help motivate their daughters 3. Active travel is a promising way to increase girls’ activity 4. Active after school clubs are promising but need to be designed to appeal to girls and boys.

research review

Barriers and Facilitators to physical activity and sedentary behaviour in children under 6

Last Updated: 6/29/2017

A systematic review has been published exploring the qualitative evidence on barriers and facilitators to physical activity and sedentary behaviour in young children (aged 0-6). The review looked at perceptions of children, parents and childcare providers on their barriers and enablers to physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Overall, 77 barriers and facilitators were identified which fitted into seven broad themes: the child, the home, out of home childcare, parent-childcare provider interaction, environment, safety and weather.

resource

MyParkScotland Crowfund Resource Kit

Last Updated: 6/27/2017

Funded by Awards for All, the Resource Kit introduces and explains the concept of crowdfunding and helps groups plan, run and deliver their crowdfunding campaigns. Included within the Resource Kit is the Crowdfunding Campaign Planning Worksheet - this editable document is designed to help groups think about elements of their crowdfunding campaign including growing your crowd, getting the message right, how to get that message across and what to do when the campaign is complete. The resource kit is designed to help groups plan their campaign before pressing go and working through the Kit will increase the likelihood of the campaign being successful.

Evidence Brief

Urban Greenspace Interventions and Health

Last Updated: 6/26/2017

A new World Health Organization (WHO) report provides the results of an evidence review and an assessment of local case studies on urban green space interventions. Interventions to increase or improve urban green space can deliver positive health, social and environmental outcomes for all population groups, particularly among lower socioeconomic status groups. However, there is a need for better inclusion of health and equity outcomes in studies on green space interventions, and an improved monitoring of local green space management and related health and equity impacts. Local experiences and urban practice suggest that multidisciplinary planning, cross sectoral collaborations and community engagement in the planning process are essential to ensure that urban green space interventions deliver on multiple outcomes and provide a variety of functional opportunities that attract different population groups. Urban green space interventions seem to be most effective when a physical improvement to the green space is coupled with a social engagement/participation element to promote the green space and reach out to new target groups.

resource

Active in Retirement and Choosing to be Active Videos

Last Updated: 5/22/2017

NHS Tayside have produced two short films which can be integrated as part of new staff induction and retirement. These videos raise awareness of Physical Activity messages and can be accessed from the links below:

research

Sport for Change Research

Last Updated: 5/19/2017

This research explores how the ‘sport for change’ approach can be developed and supported within Scotland. It has been commissioned by The Robertson Trust, Scottish Government, sportscotland and the Sport for Change Network Scotland and undertaken by Research Scotland.

Showing 1 to 20 of 23 1 2 >

Copyright 2009 NHS Health Scotland